Book Review: Just Mercy

In Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, attorney and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), Bryan Stevenson, recounts his experiences working to appeal the sentences of prison inmates, particularly those on death row. While this book was another on my books to read list for quite some time, the current atmosphere of…

Book Review: Sense and Sensibility

I really love Jane Austen’s books – or at least most of them. I did not mean to read two Austen books back-to-back, but I became really disenchanted with the nonfiction bore I kept attempting to finish reading (and I was feeling the “do more of what you love” empowerment) so I threw my reading…

Book Review: Northanger Abbey

Pride and Prejudice and Emma, two of Jane Austen’s other books rank as two of my favorite novels of all time. Recently I remembered that I’ve owned a tattered copy of Northanger Abbey for years, but I hadn’t actually read it yet. Honestly there’s no better time to visit Austen’s world than the holidays when…

Book Review: The Devil in the White City

This book was referred to me way back when I lived in Paris. A classmate knew I was from the Chicago-ish area and asked if I had ever read Erik Larson’s narrative on “murder, magic, and madness at the fair that changed America.” I hadn’t yet, but when I was told that the book was…

Book review: The Bourne Identity

I remember when The Bourne Identity movie came out. My dad and I agreed that it was SO GOOD. My mom, on the other hand, was appalled. She had read the book first and claimed that the film depicted a wildly different story line. I ignored her and continued blissfully enjoying the entire Bourne film…

Book review: Into the Wild

Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer (1996), was a bummer of a book. Describing the ultimately fatal journey of a disillusioned, middle-class young man into the Alaskan wilderness, the book seeks to explain how and why Chris McCandless died. Through interviews with the family members he abandoned on the East Coast and the friends he…

Book Review: Setting the Table

When a book written in 2006 makes you want to book a table at a restaurant in 2019, you know it has successfully captured the essence of enduring timeliness – something that restaurateur and author, Danny Meyer should be proud of in his career. I first heard of Danny Meyer last summer when I attended…

Book Review: Frankenstein

In response to a challenge by the poet Lord Byron, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wrote Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. Started in 1816 and published anonymously in 1818, the story chronicles the exploits of Victor Frankenstein. Well bred for a life of academic success, the young scholar submerses himself in the challenge of creating new life…

Book Review: Hidden Figures

I’m a huge proponent of reading books before watching corresponding movies. Unfortunately in this case, the movie came before the book. Tiny tangent before I actually review the book, watching movies first is the worst because humans are able to hold images in their minds much easier than words (for the most part). Since I…

Book Review: A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

Written in 1889, the novel follows Hank Morgan, an modern day (19th century) engineer from Connecticut, who gets hit in the head and wakes up in the 6th century. Early in the story, Hank is captured by one of the knights of the Round Table and brought to the court of King Arthur and Lady…